Louise Hickman

Transcription Machines: Feminist Labor and Access Work

Sins Invalid, An Unashamed Claim to Beauty in the Face of Invisibility. Sins Invalid is one of my favorite American projects, based in the San Francisco Bay Area. It is a performance based collective ‘that incubates and celebrates’ artists with disabilities, particularly ‘artists of color and queer and gender-variant, as communities who have historically been …

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Summer 2012, there are two buzz words in circulation, independently and in conjunction with one another: superhuman and inspiration. At the ugly end of the spectrum, ‘inspiration porn’ is making its appearance across social networks; a larger man with artificial limbs leans down to a young girl, also with artificial limbs, written across this image …

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The opportunity of adversity (?)

July 25, 2012

The opportunity of adversity

In Mullins 2009 TED talk, she said: ‘The conversation with society has changed profoundly in the last decade. It is no longer a conversation about overcoming deficiency. It’s a conversation about augmentation; it’s a conversation about potential. A prosthetic limb does not represent the need to replace the loss anymore. It can stand as a symbol that the wearer has the power to recreate whatever it is and they want to create in that space, so that people society once considered to be disabled can now become architects of their own identities.’

The one simple question I ask, who has access to this?

Join the hunt for average Joe

Everyone’s heard of Average Joe, but has anyone ever met him?
What does he look like and how does he act?
Is he even a he?
And could you be Average Joe?

This image is a part of Niet Normaal, a new exhibition which explores what is and isn’t normal through the work of cutting edge contemporary artists.

This show finished in 2010, good news, the show is being run at Liverpool as part of a disability Art festival DaDaFest. Find out more here: http://www.dadafest.co.uk/the-festival/niet-normaal/

Wellcome Collection: Superhuman

July 19, 2012

Wellcome Collection: Superhuman

Pair of artificial legs for a child (red shoes) Leather sockets at the hip and buttock of this prosthesis are open-ended to allow the natural feet to be free. The feet could then control valves that operated a set of artificial arms. The carbon dioxide cylinder that powered the upper limbs can be seen in the left leg.